Recklessly Causing Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence


In Victoria the maximum penalty for Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence under s 15B of the Crimes Act 1958 is 15 years’ imprisonment. This offence is an aggravated form of Recklessly Causing Serious Injury as it has the added element of the serious injury occurring in circumstances of ‘gross violence’.

If you are convicted of this offence, you will serve a minimum of four years’ imprisonment pursuant to sections 10 and 11 of the Sentencing Act 1991, unless a special reason such as impaired mental functioning exists.

Penalties the Court can impose for this charge:

The Offence of Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence:

The offence of Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence can be found in section 15B(1) of the Crimes Act 1958 which states: A person must not, without lawful excuse, recklessly cause serious injury to another person in circumstances of gross violence.

What is ‘serious injury’?

Section 15 of the Crimes Act 1958 states that ‘serious injury’ means an injury that:

  • Endangers life; or
  • Is substantial and protracted.

Serious injury also includes the destruction, other than in the course of a medical procedure, of the foetus of a pregnant woman, whether or not the woman suffers any other harm.

What Actions Might Constitute Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence?

Causing a serious injury to someone in the company of two or more people might constitute an example of this offence.

What the Police Must Prove:

To convict you of Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence, the prosecution must prove each of the following elements beyond a reasonable doubt:

  • The complainant suffered a serious injury;
  • You caused the complainant’s serious injury;
  • You did so recklessly;
  • The serious injury was caused in circumstances of gross violence;
  • You acted without lawful justification or excuse.

Recklessly

In order to have caused the serious injury recklessly, at the time of the offence, you must have been aware that the injury was ‘probable’ or ‘likely’ and be indifferent as to whether or not those consequences would occur. It will not be sufficient if you were aware that injury was merely ‘possible’ or might result from your actions.

Further, it is not sufficient that a reasonable person in your circumstances would have realised that their conduct would be likely to injure the complainant.

Gross Violence

Under section 15A of the Crimes Act 1958, any one of the following constitutes circumstances of gross violence:

  • The offender planned in advance to engage in conduct and at the time of planning:
    • The offender intended that the conduct would cause a serious injury; or
    • The offender was reckless as to whether the conduct would cause a serious injury; or
    • A reasonable person would have foreseen that the conduct would be likely to result in a serious injury.
  • The offender in company with two or more other persons caused the serious injury;
  • The offender entered into an agreement, arrangement or understanding with two or more other persons to cause a serious injury;
  • The offender planned in advance to have with him or her and to use an offensive weapon, firearm or imitation firearm and in fact used the offensive weapon, firearm or imitation firearm to cause the serious injury;
  • The offender continued to cause injury to the other person after the other person was incapacitated;
  • The offender caused the serious injury to the other person while the other person was incapacitated.

Possible Defences for Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence:

Possible defences to a charge of Recklessly Causing Serious Injury in Circumstances of Gross Violence include but are not limited to:

  • Self defence/defence of another
  • Factual dispute

Which Court Will Hear Your Matter?

Recklessly causing serious injury in circumstances of gross violence is a strictly indictable charge, which means that it will be heard in the County Court.

 

WHERE TO NEXT?

If you suspect that you may be under investigation, or if you have been charged with an offence, it is vital to get competent legal advice as early as possible. Our lawyers are highly specialised in criminal law and will be able to guide you through the process while dealing with the various authorities related to your matter.

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