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Contesting A Will in Tasmania


Contact Armstrong Legal:
Sydney: (02) 9261 4555
Melbourne: (03) 9620 2777
Brisbane: (07) 3229 4448
Adelaide: (08) 8410 0055
Perth: (08) 9321 5505

Alun Hill

In Tasmania, eligible persons can Contest a Will and make what is called a Family Provision claim if they have been left without adequate provision from a deceased estate.

Our team practices exclusively in Wills and Estates Law and are here to guide you through the process to the best possible outcome. If you are considering contesting a will, or if you have a question, we encourage you to call us on 1300 168 676 for a free initial case assessment.

Each State of Australia has a different set of rules which apply when contesting a Will. There are different time limits and eligibility differs in each State depending on where the deceased died. If the deceased died in the Tasmania, the information below is relevant.

Almost all of our Contesting a Will work in Tasmania is done on a No Win No Fee basis.

Grounds for contesting a will in Tasmania

Contesting a Will in Tasmania refers to making a Family Provision Claim.

In Tasmania, you may contest a Will if:

  1. You are an Eligible Applicant; and
  2. You believe that you have been left without adequate provision for your proper maintenance and support. The Court considers a number of factors when ascertaining whether an estate has made adequate provision.

Each case is different on its facts and we recommend that you call us on 1300 168 676 for a free case assessment.

How to contest a will in Tasmania?

A family provision claim is made in Tasmania if:

  1. The Deceased was domiciled (for example, lived permanently) in Tasmania at the date of death; and
  2. The Deceased owned real estate in Tasmania at the date of death and/or personal property (for example, savings) elsewhere or in Tasmania at the date of death.

The steps involved in contesting a Will in Tasmania include the following:

  • Writing to the solicitor for the executor(s) and notifying them of your intended family provision claim;
  • Ascertaining details of the size of the estate and obtaining copies of probate documents, your current financial and health circumstances and details of your relationship with the Deceased;
  • Entering into out of court settlement negotiations with the executor(s);
  • If settlement cannot be achieved, drafting Court documents including an Affidavit in Support to commence your family provision claim in Court;
  • Attending a mediation. Most of these types of claims settle at mediation;
  • If your matter does not settle at mediation, attending the Trial hearing. Even if your matter does not settle at mediation, the parties can reach a settlement at any time between mediation and up until the completion of Trial.

Should you have any questions regarding the process involved in contesting a Will in Tasmania, please contact Armstrong Legal on 1300 168 676.

Who Can Contest a Will in Tasmania? (Eligible Applicants)

In order to contest a Will in Tasmania, you must be one of the following persons:

Spouse

Husband, Wife and person who was in a ‘significant relationship’ with the deceased person at the time of death.

‘Significant Relationship’

A ‘significant relationship’ is a relationship between two adult persons:

  • Who have a relationship as a couple; and
  • Who are not married to one another or related by family.

The ‘significant relationship’ may be registered. If registered, proof of this is required.

If the ‘significant relationship’ is unregistered, then the following factors will be taken into account when determining if two people are in a ‘significant relationship’:

  • The duration of the relationship;
  • The nature and extent of common residence;
  • Whether or not a sexual relationship exists;
  • The degree of financial dependence or interdependence, and any arrangements for financial support, between the parties;
  • The ownership, use and acquisition of property;
  • The degree of mutual commitment to a shared life;
  • The care and support of children;
  • The performance of household duties;
  • The reputation and public aspects of the relationship.

Child

Includes an adopted child, stepchild and surrogate child.

Parent

Only if the Deceased died without leaving a spouse or any children.

Divorced Husband/Wife

Only if they were receiving or entitled to receive maintenance from the Deceased person pursuant to a Court Order, agreement or otherwise.

Person who was in a ‘Significant Relationship with the Deceased’ and the relationship had ceased before the date of death

Only if the person was receiving or entitled to receive maintenance from the deceased person pursuant to a Court Order, agreement or otherwise.

If you believe you qualify as an ‘eligible person’ to contest a Will in Tasmania, please contact Armstrong Legal to obtain a free case assessment on 1300 168 676.

How long do I have to contest a will in Tasmania? (Time Limits)

Tasmania has the one of the shortest time limits in Australia in which to contest a Will.

How long do I have to contest a Will?

Your claim must be filed before and no later than 3 months after the date of Grant of Probate (where the Deceased died with a Will) or Letters of Administration (where the Deceased died without a Will).

What happens if I miss the time limit?

You may be able to file after the 3 month time limit, but only if the Court grants you permission to do so. The Court will consider the persons affected (such as the persons who have already received a distribution, those named in the Will or who received an entitlement from the estate if there is no Will) or persons who are likely to be affected by your out of time claim.

An out of time application can only be made if the whole estate has not yet been fully distributed. Any part of the estate distributed before an out of time application is made, cannot be disturbed.

If you are unsure whether you can contest a Will, please act quickly and contact Armstrong Legal on 1300 168 676, as there a strict time limits in place.

How do I get a copy of a will in Tasmania?

If you have a close family member who has recently passed away and you are uncertain as to what was contained in their Will, we encourage you to contact the executor (person named in the will who will be in charge of administering the estate) or the executor’s solicitor, to request a copy of the Will.

In Tasmania, there are certain persons who are entitled to inspect a copy of the Deceased’s Will.

If you are one of the following persons, you are entitled to inspect and take copies (at your own expense) of a Deceased person’s Will (including a revoked or purported Will):

  • A person referred to in the Will (whether or not named as a beneficiary);
  • A spouse, parent or guardian and any children;
  • A person who is entitled to a share of the estate if the deceased died without a Will;
  • Any creditor or other person having a claim at law or in equity against the estate;
  • A named beneficiary in a prior Will of the deceased;
  • A parent or guardian of a minor referred to in the Will or who would be entitled to a share of the estate if the deceased person had died without a Will.

If you are having difficulty obtaining a copy of a deceased close family member's Will, please contact our office on 1300 168 676 so that we can assist you.

Costs of contesting a will in the TAS / who pays fees?

In Tasmania, costs are determined by the Judge of the Court and it is entirely discretionary. However, this does not affect the entitlement of an executor or administrator, who has reasonably instituted or resisted any proceeding, to costs out of the estate.

For a person contesting a Will, the Judge will determine by whom, from where and to what extent legal costs are to be paid.

Generally, costs follow the event. This means, if you are successful, then the Court is likely to order that your legal costs be paid out of the estate. However, if you are unsuccessful, then the Court will most likely order that you bear your own costs. If the Court considers that you should not have brought the claim because it had no proper basis, then you may be ordered to pay the estate’s legal costs in addition to your own legal costs.

Please contact Armstrong Legal on 1300 168 676 to obtain further information regarding legal costs and find out if you are eligible for a No Win No Fee cost agreement.

Dying without a will? (Intestacy)

If a person dies without a Will, they have died intestate.

The person who is the senior next of kin is generally the person who will need to apply for Letters of Administration and that person will then become the Administrator.

Once a Grant of Letters of Administration is issued by the Court, an Administrator must collect the deceased’s assets and distribute them to the beneficiaries.

In Tasmania, the following persons are entitled to an estate when that person dies without a Will:

Spouse

You are ‘spouse’ if you were:

  • Married to the deceased, immediately before death of deceased;
  • In a ‘registered personal relationship’ with deceased immediately before death. This means, either in a:
    • Registered ‘significant relationship’ (see Who can Contest a Will in Tas?) or;
    • Registered ‘caring relationship’ (you need proof of registration to prove relationship):
      • A ‘caring relationship’ is a relationship other than a marriage or significant relationship between two adult persons whether or not related by family, one or each of whom provides the other with domestic support and personal care.
      • A ‘caring relationship’ does not exist if domestic support and personal care is provided–
        • for fee (does not include Carer’s allowance) or payment in the nature of wages; or
        • under an employment relationship between the persons; or
        • on behalf of another person or an organisation (including a government or government agency, a body corporate or a charitable or benevolent organisation).
  • Was a party to a ‘significant relationship’ (see Who can Contest a Will in Tas?) with the Deceased, immediately before their death AND:
    • Was in existence for a period of at least 2 years before the Deceased’s death; or
    • Had resulted in the birth of a child.

If you qualify as a 'spouse', what do you receive from the estate?

  • If there is a surviving spouse and no children of the Deceased or spouse, then the spouse will receive the entire estate.
  • If there is a surviving spouse and children of the Deceased and spouse, then the spouse will receive the entire estate.
  • If there is a surviving spouse and no children of the Deceased, but children of the spouse, then the spouse will receive the entire estate.
  • If there is a surviving spouse and children of the Deceased who are not children of the spouse, then the spouse receives the following:
    • The Deceased’s personal effects
    • Statutory Legacy = $350,000 (adjusted according to CPI)
    • One half of the remainder of the estate

The children of the Deceased receive the other one half of the remainder of the estate.

Multiple Spouses

  • If there is only one surviving spouse, then the spouse can elect to acquire property from the estate. In some cases, the Court’s authorisation may be required. An administrator is required to give notice to a spouse within one month of the Grant of Letters of Administration. The spouse then has 3 months from the date the notice is given in which to exercise the election. If the spouse is also the Administrator, then they have 3 months after the administration commences. The Court may grant permission to extend the time in specific circumstances.
  • If there is more than one surviving spouse, but no children, the spouses are entitled to the whole estate in shares determined by the law.
  • If there is more than one surviving spouse and children who are children of one or more of the surviving spouses, the surviving spouses are entitled to the whole of the estate in shares determined by the law.
  • If the deceased leaves more than one surviving spouse and children who are not children of the spouse, the spouses are entitled to the following:
    • The Deceased’s personal effects;
    • Statutory Legacy = $350,000 (adjusted according to CPI)
    • One half of the remainder of the estate.

Children

A ‘child’ includes an ‘adopted child.’

If there is no surviving spouse and only surviving children, then the estate goes to the children equally (or grandchildren if the child or children are deceased).

Parents

If there is no surviving spouse or children, then the entire estate goes to the living parent or parents of the deceased.

Brothers and Sisters

If there is no surviving spouse, children, parents, then the entire estate goes to the brothers and sisters of the deceased.

Grandparents

If there is no surviving spouse, children, parents, brothers or sisters, then the entire estate goes to the grandparents of the deceased.

Uncles and Aunts

If there is no surviving spouse, children, parents, brothers or sisters or grandparents, then the entire estate goes to the uncles and aunts of the deceased.

The State Government

If there is no living relative who is entitled to the intestate estate, then the estate goes to the State Government. However, the Government may pay some money to a 'dependent' if it is established that the deceased had a dependent.

This is generally when the intestate has left behind a spouse or partner as well as children or grandchildren. The way it’s broken up depends on the dollar value of the estate.

The above persons must have survived the deceased for 30 days.

If you are unsure as to whether you qualify to receive an inheritance from an intestate estate, please contact Armstrong Legal on 1300 168 676.

Can a Niece or Nephew Contest a Will?

In Tasmania, a niece of nephew is not eligible to contest a will.

In rare cases, the niece or nephew may have been adopted by the Deceased during their lifetime. This means, the niece or nephew becomes an ‘adopted child’, who is eligible to contest a Will in Tasmania.

If you are unsure as to whether you can contest a Will, please contact our office on 1300 168 676 for an initial assessment.

Can Grandchildren contest a Will?

In Tasmania, grandchildren are not eligible to contest a will.

In rare cases, the grandchild was adopted by the Deceased during their lifetime. This means, the grandchild becomes an ‘adopted child’, who is eligible to contest a Will.

If you are uncertain as to whether you qualify to contest a Will, please call 1300 168 676 to speak to one of our lawyers to obtain an initial free assessment.





where to next?

Have you been left without adequate provision from a deceased estate? We offer a free assessment of your case and a no win no fee policy. We have a specialist team that deals only in Wills & Estates servicing NSW, VIC, QLD, ACT, SA & WA. The law relating to Wills and Estates can often be complex and confusing so we encourage you to make contact with our team.

Why Choose Armstrong Legal?

Contact Armstrong Legal:
Sydney: (02) 9261 4555
Melbourne: (03) 9620 2777
Brisbane: (07) 3229 4448
Adelaide: (08) 8410 0055
Perth: (08) 9321 5505