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Furious Driving

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Contact Armstrong Legal:
Sydney: (02) 9261 4555

John Sutton

In NSW it is an offence to drive in a manner, pace or speed which causes danger to a person or other road users. This is known as ‘furious driving’ and is similar to offences relating to dangerous driving or driving at a dangerous speed.

A person can be charged with this offence if they drive their car in a way that creates a risk to other road users. The manner in which they drive the car may become furious due to the speed at which they drive or the way in which they manoeuvre the car, such as swerving or driving into or near other motorists or pedestrians.

There are two very similar offences which relate to furious driving, one in the Crimes Act 1900 and one in the Road Transport Act 2013. Police more commonly charge a person under the Road Transport Act 2013.

Under the Crimes Act 1900 the maximum penalty for this offence is two years imprisonment. This offence also requires a person to have been injured by the furious driving.

Under the Road Transport Act 2013 the maximum penalty for a first offence is 9 months imprisonment. There is also an automatic period of disqualification of 3 years with a minimum period of disqualification of 6 months.

If the offence is classified as a second offence the maximum penalty increases. An offence is classified as a second offence if the person has been convicted of a major traffic offence (such as a drink driving offence or drive while suspended offence) within the previous five years. The maximum penalty for a second offence is 2 years imprisonment. There is also an automatic period of disqualification of 5 years with a minimum period of disqualification of 2 years.

THE OFFENCE OF FURIOUS DRIVING:

The traditional offence of Furious Driving is contained in s 53 of the Crimes Act 1900 and states:

Whosoever, being at the time on horseback, or in charge of any carriage or other vehicle, by wanton or furious riding, or driving, or racing, or other misconduct, or by wilful neglect, does or causes to be done to any person any bodily harm, shall be liable to imprisonment for two years.

An alternate offence of Furious Driving is contained in s 117(2) of the Road Transport Act 2013 and states:

(2) A person must not drive a motor vehicle on a road furiously, recklessly or at a speed or in a manner dangerous to the public.

Maximum penalty: 20 penalty units or imprisonment for 9 months or both (in the case of a first offence) or 30 penalty units or imprisonment for 12 months or both (in the case of a second or subsequent offence).

WHAT ACTIONS MIGHT CONSTITUTE FURIOUS DRIVING?

Examples of Furious Driving include:

  • Driving your car around in circles with someone on the bonnet who flies off and grazes their elbow;
  • Speeding 50km/h in excess of the posted speed limit;
  • Breaking sharply before accelerating, speeding and swerving all over the road;

WHAT THE POLICE MUST PROVE:

To convict you of Furious Driving the prosecution must prove each of the following matters beyond reasonable doubt:

  • That you were driving a car; and
  • That you were doing so in a way which was furious, reckless or at a speed or in a manner dangerous to the public.

In respect of the offence under the Crimes Act 1900, the police must also prove that you caused bodily harm.

POSSIBLE DEFENCES FOR FURIOUS DRIVING:

The most common ways to defend this charge are:

  • To maintain your innocence if you did not commit the act;
  • To argue that you were not driving the car;
  • To argue that the way in which you were driving the car was not furious or reckless;
  • To argue that the way in which you were driving the car was not in such a speed or manner which was dangerous to the public;
  • To raise duress, necessity or self-defence as the reason for your conduct; or
  • In respect of the offence under the Crimes Act 1900, to argue that you did not cause bodily harm.

WHICH COURT WILL HEAR YOUR MATTER?

The offence under the Crimes Act 1900 is a Table 1 offence which means the offence will be finalised in the Local Court unless the prosecution or person charged elects to have the matter finalised in the District Court.

The offence under the Road Transport Act 2013 is a Summary Offence which means that it must be finalised in the Local Court.


where to next?

In NSW, traffic offences are treated seriously. Therefore, it is important to get competent legal advice as early as possible, whether you have received a penalty notice, had your licence suspended or been charged with a serious offence. Our lawyers are highly experienced and understand the difficulties you face without a licence. We can guide you through the process while dealing with the various authorities related to your matter.

Why Choose Armstrong Legal?

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